8 Ways You Can Prevent & Manage Diabetes

8 Ways You Can Prevent & Manage Diabetes

Diabetes is a silent disease affecting the lives of millions each year. Chances are you know someone with diabetes—a friend, family member or maybe even you. I am one of the millions living with diabetes. As a certified diabetes educator, I work to educate myself and others about how to prevent diabetes from impacting your life and how you can take care of yourself and improve your health if you have diabetes.

What Is Diabetes?

Diabetes happens when your body does not properly use the sugar in your body. The different types of diabetes are related to the reasons the body is not using the sugar. This excess sugar causes clogs in the blood stream, leading to complications.

Type 2 diabetes is the most common. With type 2 diabetes, the body either doesn’t produce enough insulin, or it resists insulin. Insulin helps keep your blood sugar level from getting too high.

Symptoms of Type 2 Diabetes

  • Increased thirst
  • Frequent urination
  • Hunger
  • Fatigue
  • Blurred vision

However, in some cases, there may be no symptoms.

Risk Factors for Developing Type 2 Diabetes

  • Having prediabetes
  • Being overweight
  • Being 45 years or older
  • Having a parent, brother or sister with type 2 diabetes
  • Being physically active less than three times a week
  • Previous gestational diabetes (diabetes during pregnancy) or given birth to a baby who weighed more than nine pounds
  • Being African-American, Hispanic/Latino-American, American Indian or Alaska Native (some Pacific Islanders and Asian Americans are also at higher risk)

How Do I Manage Diabetes?

We must help our bodies use the sugar. When I think about how best to care for diabetes I think about BALANCE. It’s all about eating healthier, exercising more and taking better care of ourselves.

Balance in diabetes can mean a lot of things – both in terms of preventing diabetes and taking care of yourself if you have diabetes. We all know if we don’t care for ourselves, then we can’t care for others.

8 Ways to Take Care of Yourself

Here are eight areas that I focus on and share with others to take care of yourself.

1. Eat Mindfully

  • Don’t eat in front of the TV
  • Take small bites
  • Taste your food
  • Add protein and fiber to feel full

2. Take Time to Exercise & Be Active

  • Park farther away
  • Stand during commercials
  • At a minimum, commit to five minutes of exercise…it’s better than zero

3. Be Consistent When Taking Medicine

  • Place your medicine where you will see it
  • Use an alarm to remind yourself when to take your medicine
  • Mark your calendar so you know you took your medicine
  • Follow your doctor’s advice

4. Find Ways to Decrease Stress

  • Take ten deep breaths
  • Get five minutes of quiet – put yourself in timeout if you have to! (your kids will find this intriguing)

5. Add Vegetables so Meals Aren’t Meat or Carbohydrate-Heavy

  • Add lots of color
  • Make a meal plan
  • Don’t fight it…just get creative!

6. Find Ways to Keep Your Whole Family Active

  • Go swimming together
  • Go to the zoo
  • Take the kids shopping
  • Use active video games like Wii or YouTube

7. Find Ways to Eat at Home, Even When You Don’t Want to Cook

  • Cook freezer or microwaveable meals
  • Cook in the crockpot
  • Plan ahead and prepare the day or weekend before

8. Eat More Fruits & Vegetables

  • Look for sales (canned and frozen often are on sale)
  • Take vegetables from neighbors or coworkers who grow them
  • Grow your own garden
  • Buy what’s in season

Taking a Goal & Making It SMART

Much of what I do in my job is help people figure out how to achieve their goals. For instance, I would love to lose ten pounds. How can I do that? I can exercise more and eat less. However, these plans are vague. When making goals, we have to make the goal SMART.

S – Specific: I will increase my exercise by five minutes each day.
M – Measurable: I will exercise an extra 25 minutes per week.
A – Achievable: I can add five extra minutes of exercise per day while watching TV.
R – Realistic: I can add five minutes in the evening and increase my exercise. I don’t have time to increase my exercise by 30 minutes a day, but I can add five minutes a day.
T – Time-bound: I will increase my exercise and reevaluate by the end of the month. If no improvement is seen, I will change my goal strategy.

Get the Help You Need to Prevent or Manage Diabetes

If you’re concerned about developing diabetes or struggling with your diabetes or weight management (which could lead to diabetes), there is help waiting for you. Bryan Diabetes Center has nurses who are certified diabetes educators and licensed medical nutrition therapists/registered dietitians who also serve as diabetes educators. Insurance often covers this kind of education.

Bryan Health Diabetes Center

Learn more about how diabetes impacts the lives of millions every single day, get management tips, and easily schedule an appointment to speak with a diabetes expert at Bryan Health today!

We’re here to help you manage your diabetes or get on track to prevent getting diabetes in the future.

Ask your provider for a referral to Bryan Diabetes Center today! We have three locations:

  • Bryan Medical Plaza, 1600 S. 48th St.
  • Bryan LifePointe Campus, 7501 S. 27th St.
  • NorthPointe Family Medicine, 5901 N. 27th St., Suite 102

Check out these resources:

Samantha Beckler

Samantha Beckler

Health Expert

Samantha Beckler is a Certified Diabetes Educator with Bryan Diabetes Center.

Plastic Surgery after Babies…Yay or Nay?

Plastic Surgery after Babies…Yay or Nay?

Saggy breasts, excess skin and my favorite, the love pouch. Like most women, my body changed after having kids. It wasn’t until I knew I was done having babies that I considered plastic surgery.

Mothers, by nature, are givers. We take care of our children, our husbands, our coworkers, other family members and friends…all before we think of ourselves. It’s rare for a mom to schedule time or activities just for herself, without feeling some degree of guilt that she’s taking time away from her family or work.

My body image is directly related to my self-esteem and how I view myself. When I feel fit, healthy and sexy, everyone benefits. My family sees a happy, confident, energetic mother who serves as a great role model.

Finding Pride in a Mother’s Body

I am proud of this body. It made two beautiful children. This is the body God gave me and I’m grateful. I’ve put in the work, I’ve lost over 40 pounds in the last year and a half, and I continue to workout and eat healthy almost every day. I’m full of energy and overall happier with my transformation. Yet, the excess skin is still there, and I’m self-conscious of my mid-section and my nonexistent boobs. I want to look as good as I feel. My children see me push through every workout. They see me say no to desserts (most of the time). Now, I want them to see my happiness. I want to see my gains in the mirror but all I see is a big stomach.

It is NOT selfish or vain for a woman to want to look good! A mother deserves to look as fit, youthful and toned as she can. Who wouldn’t want to look their very best physical self?

How a mother feels about herself as a wife and a woman is integral to her body image and self-esteem. When we look our best, we feel more secure and reflect that to others, exuding confidence, happiness and overall attractiveness. When a mother feels confident about her body, she is happier overall, her marriage benefits and so does her relationship with her children.

The Pros and Cons of Having Plastic Surgery

I know the pros and cons of having plastic surgery but the struggle I can’t seem to come to terms with is: how can I explain to my daughter that you should love yourself the way you are and that the way you look on the outside doesn’t matter, then turn around and get plastic surgery to fix something about me? However, she sees me struggle and my want for something I can’t seem to obtain on my own. Should that be enough justification? Does it make me a bad mom to say one thing and do another?

For a mom to want to take care of herself and feel youthful, feminine and attractive is NOT self-centered or unreasonable.

Having a surgical procedure is a BIG DEAL. Surgery should not be taken lightly, and planning for recovery time and help with child care, driving and the usual activities of daily living after plastic surgery is extremely important.

As long as you can afford the time needed for surgical recovery, have help in caring for your children and understand fully the risks of surgery, I can completely understand why a mom would consider going under the knife! However, knowing that you should love your body and yourself is the main priority. If you’re happy with yourself but want to enhance or better your body, then there’s no problem with considering plastic surgery.

Schedule Your Free Consultation

Did you know Dr. Cassidy Mitchell, plastic and reconstructive surgeon, offers free consultations to answer your questions and help you decide if plastic surgery is right for you.

Mallory Connelly

Mallory Connelly

Babies & Toddlers

In addition to the time I devote to being a mom, I also work full-time outside the home, which means my day is hardly ever as simple as nine to five. With an all-too-established schedule, as soon as I walk through the door, my day doesn’t end, but rather just begins. It’s a balancing act, especially with two children, but being a mom is one full-time job that I never want to quit!

Foods & Exercises to Reduce Your Arthritis Pain

Foods & Exercises to Reduce Your Arthritis Pain

The pain and discomfort of arthritis can have a big effect on your quality of life. A good exercise program and a healthy diet have been shown to increase your mobility (ability to get around) and provide medication-free pain relief.

3 Areas of Focus to Reduce Your Arthritis Pain

As a nurse practitioner, I believe knowledge is power. Here are three items I share with my patients to improve their daily life with arthritis:

  • Foods to avoid because they can increase inflammation and arthritis symptoms
  • Foods that can decrease some of your arthritis pains
  • Exercises you can do without causing stress and pressure on your joints


Foods to Avoid if You Have Arthritis

There are certain types of foods that are considered pro-inflammatory, meaning they can increase inflammation. In general, more inflammation equals more pain, specifically in your joints.

Limit the following in your diet to avoid inflammation:

  • Sugar
  • Saturated fats
  • Trans fats
  • Refined carbohydrates
  • MSG
  • Aspartame
  • Alcohol

Foods high in sodium also have been found to increase inflammation, so it’s important that you try to limit these types of foods in your diet.

Most people in America tend to have diets that are high in saturated fats and trans fats. A good step is to look at food labels and make sure these are limited, if not completely eliminated from your diet.

In general, try to avoid the inner aisles of the grocery store. Most foods in this area contain refined carbohydrates and things we need to avoid because they increase inflammation. Plus, this is where you’re more likely to find processed foods. For the most part, if you can’t pronounce the ingredient on the label, it’s probably not a good choice.

Foods and Supplements that Help Arthritis Pain

Many foods are considered to be anti-inflammatory. Lowering inflammation can decrease arthritis pain.

Include these foods in your diet to help fight inflammation:

  • Omega 3s, such as fish like salmon, dark leafy greens, olive oil and nuts
  • Cherries 
  • Green tea
  • Whole grains
  • Citrus fruits like pineapple and oranges
  • High fiber foods

Glucosamine and chondroitin supplements

Our general rule with supplements like glucosamine and chondroitin is to give it a try for about three months. If you do not notice a difference in your joints and your joint pain, stop taking it. Many times people find that after they stop taking it, they notice it really was working and making a difference. I have several patients that absolutely swear by glucosamine and chondroitin.

Exercises to Ease Joint and Arthritis Pain

Low impact exercises that don’t put a lot of pressure on your knees and ankles are good options if you have arthritis.

Low impact exercises include:

  • Swimming – try lifting weights in the water for an added workout
  • Machines like a NuStep, where you’re moving back and forth and not putting weight on your knees
  • Gentle walking
  • Weight lifting with the guide of a trainer who can show you ways to lift weights and still protect your joints
  • Yoga and Tai Chi

Take Steps to Control Your Arthritis Pain and Feel Better

By reducing inflammation, you’ll have more energy to get out and walk, stretch and do other activities. If you need a bit of direction, working with a personal trainer or a nutritionist is a wonderful option.

Knowledge is power. The more you know about your disease process, proper nutrition and exercise, the better prepared you’ll be to take steps toward feeling better and living a more active, less painful life.

Want More Information on the Ways to Manage Arthritis?

Jaimie Russell

Jaimie Russell

APRN-NP

Jaimie Russell, APRN-NP, is a nurse practitioner with the Arthritis Center of Nebraska

The #1 Deadly Condition Treated in the Hospital May Surprise You

The #1 Deadly Condition Treated in the Hospital May Surprise You

It’s unknown to most people but serious and life threatening.

Being an ICU nurse, I have seen it all. I’ve seen young children come in struggling to breathe due to an asthma attack. I’ve seen elderly people come in after having CPR to restart their heart. I’ve helped bring people back to life. But, the thing that I have seen most in the hospital might surprise you. When you think of what the number one cause of death in the United States would be, what comes to mind? Cancer? Heart disease? While those are prevalent throughout the United States, it might surprise you to know that sepsis is the leading cause of death in United States hospitals.

So, What in the World is Sepsis?

With September being Sepsis Awareness Month, I feel it is important for you to know what sepsis is and how to prevent/detect sepsis in yourself or your loved ones. So, what in the world is sepsis? In general, it is the body’s overwhelming response to an infection that can lead to tissue damage, organ failure, amputations, and even death.

You may have never even heard of sepsis. Most people haven’t. Yet, it is the number one killer with people coming to the ER when they are already in organ failure. Like a heart attack or stroke, time is of the essence when treating sepsis. This is necessary to protect your organs from going into failure.

Do You Know the Warning Signs and Importance of Immediate Treatment?

Here are some facts that may surprise you:

  • Less than 1% of the population can name the signs and symptoms of sepsis
  • Death from sepsis increases by as much as 8% for every hour that treatment is delayed
  • Most cases of sepsis begin at home (up to 87% of sepsis cases) and not in the hospital
  • As many as 80% of sepsis deaths could be prevented with rapid diagnosis and treatment

Most people either don’t know about sepsis or they assume it only happens to a vulnerable population. The truth is, sepsis knows no age discrimination, it doesn’t affect men more than women, and it doesn’t affect the older generation more than young children.

What are the Warning Signs?

Sepsis can start with something as simple as a small cut or a toothache that can develop into an infection. Now, not every cut or toothache develops into sepsis, but it is important to know what to look for as a possible indication of sepsis. So you may be asking, what are the signs and symptoms?

Think SEPSIS

S – Shivering, fever, or very cold

E – Extreme pain or general discomfort (“worst ever”)

P – Pale or discolored skin

S – Sleepy, difficult to rouse, confused

I – “I feel like I might die”

S – Shortness of breath

Take ACTION

If you see a combination of these symptoms and suspect sepsis, see a medical professional IMMEDIATELY.  The sooner treatment gets started, the better chance you or your loved one has at surviving and making a full recovery.

When caught early, immediate administration of IV antibiotics and fluids can be all you need to make a full recovery. However, if organ failure has already started by the time someone comes to the hospital, they may need to come see me in the ICU. You may need medications to raise your blood pressure or have a breathing tube hooked up to a ventilator to help provide the oxygen you need. The longer someone delays getting treatment for sepsis, the greater the likelihood that the person will have severe complications such as kidney failure requiring dialysis or problems taking care of themselves (such as walking by yourself, bathing, brushing your teeth, etc.). It can even lead to death.

Be Informed, Tell Others – Let’s Raise Awareness and Save Lives

As a nurse, I have made it my job to tell all my friends and loved ones about the signs and symptoms of sepsis, and ways to prevent it.

Prevention starts with something as simple as washing your hands and cleaning any cut/injury. A lot of people don’t realize that bacteria naturally lives on your skin and given the right circumstances can grow into an infection from something as little as a cut or burn.

I urge you to tell everyone you know about the signs and symptoms as well as the ways to prevent sepsis. With your help, we can increase awareness of sepsis so people will seek treatment sooner, and lives will be saved.

Learn More About Sepsis

To learn more about Sepsis, listen to our latest Bryan Health podcast. Bill Johnson, MD, Nebraska Pulmonary Specialties shares how you can spot this condition, and emphasizes how early diagnosis and treatment can be lifesaving.

Paige Fellers

Paige Fellers

RN, ICU

Paige Fellers is a registered nurse in the ICU at Bryan Health.

Mommy Me Time

Mommy Me Time

We all have our mommy to-do lists. After dropping off the kids, working a full day with deadlines that never end, picking up the kids, making dinner, doing homework, giving baths, reading stories before bed and doing housework, I am too tired to do anything for me. I just put on my pjs and go to sleep. I know that tomorrow will be the same as today. That’s why I realized that taking time for myself is necessary. Read More

Preventing & Managing Diabetes

Preventing & Managing Diabetes

Diabetes is a silent disease affecting the lives of millions each year. Chances are you know someone with diabetes—a friend, family member or maybe even you. I am one of the millions living with diabetes. As a certified diabetes educator, I work to educate myself and others about how to prevent diabetes from impacting your life and how you can take care of yourself to improve your health if you have diabetes. Read More

5 Crucial Numbers Every Woman Needs to Know

5 Crucial Numbers Every Woman Needs to Know

Did you know that over 44 million women in the United States have heart disease? While some experience noticeable symptoms, many do not. As a woman and vascular surgeon, keeping myself and other women aware and knowledgeable about their heart is important to me. When it comes to your health, there are five crucial numbers to know about your heart. Read More

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